Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Contractures

Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Contractures

Patients with progressive neuromuscular diseases like Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) have extremity weakness that can predispose to contractures, defined as “a lack of full passive range of motion due to joint, muscle, or soft tissue limitations.”1 The etiology of...
Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Assessment of Growth and Growth Delay

Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Assessment of Growth and Growth Delay

Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a congenital, progressive neuromuscular disease with the most common age of onset in early childhood.1 Childhood is a period of significant growth and development. While patients with some forms of SMA (type 0 and 1) will experience...
Feeding, Swallowing, and GI Issues – Non-Sitters

Feeding, Swallowing, and GI Issues – Non-Sitters

Feeding and swallowing are among the chief concerns for families and healthcare providers on non-sitters with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).1 Bulbar muscle dysfunction affects the laryngeal and pharyngeal muscles, which can interfere with the ability to swallow and...
Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1

Spinal Muscular Atrophy Type 1

Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) type 1, formerly known as Werdnig-Hoffmann disease, is the most common form of SMA, accounting for more than half of all reported cases.1 The onset of symptoms in type 1 SMA occurs after birth (differentiating it from type 0 SMA) and...